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Philadelphia PA Estate Planning Blog

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Joint Accounts with Children = Poor Estate Plan

Three Reasons Joint Accounts May Be a Poor Estate Plan

By Jeremy A. Wechsler, Esq.
Your Estate Planning & Asset Protection Attorney

Many people see joint ownership of investments, bank accounts and real estate as an inexpensive way to avoid probate since joint property passes automatically to the joint owner upon death. Joint ownership can also be an easy way to plan for incapacity since the joint owner of accounts can pay bills and manage investments if the primary owner falls ill or suffers from dementia. These are all legitimate benefits of joint ownership, but three potential drawbacks exist as well described below. Please note that I am discussing joint ownership with your children or other loved ones, excluding your spouse. Jointly owning property with a spouse is normal and makes complete sense. 

Drawbacks to Joint Accounts:

  1. Risk: Joint owners of accounts have complete, unconditional access and the ability to use the funds for their own purposes. I have seen children who are caring for their parents take money without first making sure the amount is accepted by all the children. In addition, joint assets are available in the case of divorce, creditor claims, bankruptcy, lawsuits and more. Joint assets could be considered as belonging to all joint owners if applying for public benefits or financial aid.

  2. Inequity. If you have one or more children on certain accounts, but not all children, at your death some children may end up inheriting more than the others. While you may expect that all of the children will share equally (“they will do the right thing”), it is far from a guarantee. If you have several children, you can maintain accounts with each, but you will have to constantly work to make sure the accounts are all at the same level, and there is little guarantee that this plan will actually work. This type of planning will only create discord and conflict in the family later on.

  3. The Unexpected. A plan based on joint accounts can truly fail if a child passes away before the parent. Then it may be necessary to seek guardianship to manage the funds or they may ultimately pass to the surviving siblings with nothing or only a small portion going to the deceased child's family. For example, a mother put her house in joint ownership with her son to avoid probate and Medicaid’s estate recovery claim. When the son died unexpectedly, the daughter-in-law was left high and dry despite having devoted the prior six years to caring for her husband's mother.

If you are concerned about incapacity, instead of joint accounts, consider using a power of attorney. It is much safer and does not give the appointed agent personal rights over your funds (unlike as a joint owner). The agent has a fiduciary responsibility to you and your beneficiaries.

Regarding probate and ease of administration, joint accounts are convenient but as described above, it presents risks. In Pennsylvania, probate is not a difficult or burdensome process. Also, property passing to children is taxed at a 4.5% inheritance tax rate, which is a relatively low rate compared to historical federal estate tax rates. With a well written will and trust, you can have peace of mind knowing your plan will work just the way you intend it to work, free of conflict and problems. Joint accounts may seem like an easy answer, but often create more headaches. Please review your estate plan to ensure that it will work as you intend for it to work. 

 


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The Law Offices of Jeremy A. Wechsler assist clients with Estate Planning matters in Willow Grove, PA as well as Abington, Hatboro, Dresher, Horsham, Bryn Athyn, Huntingdon Valley, Fort Washington, Jenkintown, Glenside, Oreland, Warminister, Wyncote, Ambler, Elkins Park, Flourtown, Philadelphia, Warrington, Cheltenham, Gwynedd Valley, Jamison, Feasterville Trevose, Richboro, North Wales, Blue Bell, Lafayette Hill, King of Prussia, Collegeville, Oaks, Phoenixville, Oxford Valley, Langhorne, Penndel, Bristol, Fairless Hills, Bensalem, Plymouth Meeting, Furlong, Philadelphia County, Bucks County and Montgomery County.

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